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 Food processing  

Pasteurization, sterilization and heating

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Induction, infrared, microwave, high-frequency and direct conduction heating of fluids

Potential benefits

  • +High energy yield
  • +Extremely precise temperature control
  • +Little or no need for preservatives
  • +Little or no impact on taste and other sensory properties

Applications

  • Induction
    • High-speed airtight sealing of tamper-resistant packaging, leakproof stoppers and aseptic packaging
    • Faster, more hygienic and potentially cheaper than steam for demolding
  • Medium infrared
    • Browning, melting cheese, caramelizing crème brûlée, icing cookies
  • High frequency
    • Food pasteurization, sterilization (e.g., prepared dishes)

Find out more

Microwave and high-frequency technologies make it possible to heat, directly and rapidly, without an intermediary, such poorly conductive substances as agroprocessing products. For more information, see Section 4.6.2 of the page New Energy Efficient Technologies That Are Applicable to Manufacturing Processes on the Natural Resources Canada Web site.

The primary characteristic of infrared radiation (IR) heating technology is that the heat is usually absorbed at the surface of the product, causing a rapid rise in temperature. For more information, see Section 4.6.1 of the page New Energy Efficient Technologies That Are Applicable to Manufacturing Processes on the Natural Resources Canada Web site.

Heating by electromagnetic induction involves placing the material or product in a fluctuating magnetic field. Heat may be applied directly to the product, which heats it from inside, or indirectly to a surrounding cover made of metal or other material, heating it by induction. For more information, see Section 4.6.4 of the page New Energy Efficient Technologies That Are Applicable to Manufacturing Processes on the Natural Resources Canada Web site.

Ohmic heating, also known as Joule and resistive heating, is a process whereby electric current is passed directly through an item in order to heat it.

It is suitable for materials that are reasonably good conductors and often difficult to treat (because they are heat-sensitive, very viscous or messy, for instance). It can quickly heat large volumes at very precise power levels.

For more information, see Section 4.6.3 of the page New Energy Efficient Technologies That Are Applicable to Manufacturing Processes on the Natural Resources Canada Web site.


See also