Saving energy pays off

We want quality appliances that use less energy, save us money and reduce our impact on the environment. Manufacturers have responded to this demand by making major improvements in energy efficiency.

A full set of appliances—refrigerator, freezer, range, dishwasher, clothes washer and clothes dryer—purchased in 2010 uses about 2,800 kWh of electricity a year.1 That’s half the energy of a set purchased in 1990.

1

Refrigerators

ENERGY STAR® certified models are tested and certified to be at least 10% more efficient than minimum standards set by the regulations.

These models have better insulation, more energy-efficient compressors, improved heat transfer surfaces and more precise temperature and defrost controls.

Currently, there is no ENERGY STAR® specification for wine chillers.

Every year some product models earn the designation ENERGY STAR® Most Efficient. These are the best of the best. They rank at the very top of certified models for that year.

See the list of refrigerators named ENERGY STAR® Most Efficient 2016.

Good habits for your refrigerator

2

Freezers

ENERGY STAR–certified standard-size freezers must be at least 10% more energy-efficient than Canada’s minimum regulated standard.

These models have better insulation, more energy-efficient compressors, improved heat transfer surfaces and more precise temperature and defrost controls.

Chest freezers are generally more energy-efficient than upright models since less cold air escapes when the lid is opened. When you open the door of an upright freezer, the cold air flows downward and out the door, so the compressor has to work harder.

Good habits for your freezer

3

Clothes washers

You’ll find both front-loading and top-loading models that meet the ENERGY STAR® standards. They have different tub capacities and are equipped with water temperature regulators and sensors that detect the load size.

ENERGY STAR® certified clothes washers must be standard size (i.e., have a minimum tub capacity of 45 L). The specification is currently set to make them at least 59% more efficient than Canada’s minimum energy performance standard. They must also use 35% to 50% less water than ENERGY STAR certified washers made before January 1, 2007.

There is no ENERGY STAR® specification for compact clothes washers or integrated washer-dryers. (A new testing method for the latter is in development.)

Every year some product models earn the designation ENERGY STAR® Most Efficient. These are the best of the best. They rank at the very top of certified models for that year.

See the list of clothes washers named ENERGY STAR® Most Efficient 2016.

Good habits for your clothes washers

4

Dryers

Today’s electric clothes dryers use at least 17% less energy than those produced in 1990. They are better designed, with automatic controls that use moisture sensors to eliminate overdrying.

Since 2015, dryers may also be ENERGY STAR® certified.

The energy rating for clothes dryers is based on 416 operations per year, with a standard load size of 3.17 kg.

Good habits for your dryer

5

Dishwashers

To be ENERGY STAR® certified, standard-size dishwashers must be at least 17% more efficient than the minimum regulated standard in Canada. Compact dishwashers must be at least 15% more efficient. Many ENERGY STAR® certified dishwashers have smart sensors to match the wash cycle and amount of water to the size of each load. They may also have an internal heater to boost water temperature.

Good habits for your dishwashers

6

Cooking appliances

Looking for an energy-efficient cooking appliance ?

In Canada, cooking appliances meet minimum energy performance standards set by Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations and must have an EnerGuide label that says how much energy that model uses (gas ranges excepted).

Cooking appliance technology and energy efficiency

Today’s cooktops, ovens and ranges are about as energy-efficient as current technology allows. After adding better oven insulation and tighter-fitting oven doors, there are few ways left to increase the energy efficiency of these appliances.

Since the range of energy consumption between different models is small, there is no ENERGY STAR® specification to qualify cooking appliances as high efficiency.

Good habits for your cooking appliances

7

Water coolers

Water coolers are increasingly common features in Canadian homes and businesses. They provide an alternative to tap water and other beverages that is easy, accessible and served at the desired temperature.

Freestanding water coolers fall into three main categories:

  • Cold-only units have a refrigeration cycle and dispense only cold water.
  • Hot and cold units have an electric heater and a refrigeration cycle, and dispense both hot and cold water. (Some models dispense room-temperature water from a third tap.)
  • Cool and cold units have a refrigeration cycle and dispense cold and room-temperature water.

Today’s water coolers are better designed to separate hot and cold water to avoid mixing, and better insulated to keep the water at the desired temperature. They also have more efficient chilling mechanisms.

8

Dehumidifiers

Looking for an energy-efficient dehumidifier?

In Canada, dehumidifiers meet minimum energy performance standards set by Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations and display the ENERGY STAR® symbol if the model qualifies as high efficiency.

9

Room air cleaners

Room air cleaner technology and energy efficiency

A room air cleaner is a portable, electric, cord-connected appliance that removes fine particle matter such as pollen, pet dander and dust from the air.

Note : Hydro-Québec does not endorse manufacturer claims of healthier indoor air from the use of this product.

Products that qualify are the best energy performers of all makes and models on the mainstream market. They meet strict technical specifications for high efficiency—without compromising features or performance in other areas.

ENERGY STAR® qualified room air cleaners must be 40% more efficient than standard models. Air cleaners with features such as a clock or remote control must consume fewer than two watts while in standby mode.

A standard room air cleaner running nonstop uses about 550 kWh of power in a year. That’s more than some fridges!

Unit energy consumption (UEC) of household appliances, residential (kWh/year)

1990 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Refrigerator 1,504 629 604 580 549 527 511
Freezer 1,272 471 449 428 400 387 381
Dishwasher2 338 151 141 133 122 113 105
Clothes washer2 145 117 105 95 89 82 76
Dryer 1,294 964 951 940 925 918 915
Stove 803 716 697 682 664 648 632

1. Source: Natural Resources Canada

2. Excludes hot water requirements.

Kilowatthours and kilowatthours saved

An electric appliance can last from 10 to 21 years, so choosing an ENERGY STAR® certified model can save you a lot of money over time.

Advantages and features of ENERGY STAR® certified products

Energy Star®, high efficiency.

ENERGY STAR® certified products meet strict technical specifications for energy performance—tested and certified.

They save energy without compromising performance in any way. Typically, an ENERGY STAR® certified product is in the top 15% to 30% of its class for energy performance.

Learn more about energy efficiency certification