Frequently asked questions about changing your address online.

I want to remove the name of a contract holder but my address will remain the same. What do I need to do?

In the menu on the left, under Moving, select Remove address in order to remove the name of one of the contract holders.

Important: At the first step, select “No, at least one of the contract holders will stay at this address.”

You will then be able to select the name of the person who is moving out and specify the date on which his or her responsibility will end. However, if there are several contract holders and you want to remove more than one, you will need to contact customer services.

I want to add the name of a new contract holder on my invoice but we are not moving. What do I need to do?

To add another contract holder, you will need to terminate the current contract and create a new one.

In the menu on the left, under Moving, select Remove address to terminate the current contract. Then select Add address to create a new group of electricity contract holders and specify the date. Please note that the new contract holders must provide their social insurance number.

I am moving to a new address but I will be temporarily responsible for the electricity bill at my current address. Can I deal with this online?

If, for instance, you are buying a house and you are responsible for the electricity bill at that location as of today, and you will be terminating your responsibility at your former address at a later date, you can notify us of the details of your move using the Change address self-service tool.

I want to take responsibility for an electricity bill between rentals because I am the owner of a rental property. What do I need to do?

If you would like to be responsible for the electricity bill for a dwelling between two rentals, you must use the Manage Rental Units management tool for rental unit owners and managers. You can find out who is responsible for the electricity bill—the owner or the tenant—or update this information anytime, with just a few clicks.

I can’t log into my Customer Space. Why is that?

From the login page, click on Forgotten your access code to recover your username or on Forgotten your password to reset your password. You will need the e-mail address you gave us for your customer profile.

If you are still having trouble connecting, or if the e-mail address you are using is no longer valid, please contact our customer services (technical problems).

I tried to use the Change address online service but the system can’t find my new address. What do I need to do?

Make sure you have only entered the “street number” without the street name or the apartment number in the “Building number” box on the form. Then check the postal code on the Canada Post Web site to make sure it corresponds to the address. If you are still experiencing difficulties, please contact our customer services.

Is it possible to change the date on which I will leave my current address or my arrival date at my new address?

If your plans change, be sure to inform us of your new moving-in or moving-out date.

It’s easy to do from your Customer Space by selecting your arrival or departure date.

Nothing is displayed when I click on the link to see my bill. I can’t display my bill in PDF format. What should I do?

If you cannot see your bill, please contact our technical support team.

With Online Billing, can I keep getting my bills by mail?

Residential customers (Rate D) cannot continue to receive their bills by regular mail. To assist in their accounting operations, business customers (Rate G, G9, M or DM) can continue to receive printed bills along with their online bills by simply selecting the Receive bills by mail option.

If I sign up for Online Billing, how do I pay my bill?

You have a choice of four ways to pay:

  • Pre-authorized Debit—The amount to be paid is automatically debited from your bank account on the due date
  • Your financial institution’s Internet banking service
  • At an ATM or by telephone, if you have added Hydro-Québec a biller at your financial institution
  • Hydro-Québec’s Online Payment service—Make payments from your Customer Space

In fact, the only methods of payment that don’t work with Online Billing are those that require a printed payment stub.

Can I pay my online bill at an ATM?

Yes, provided that your financial institution offers biller registration. Simply add Hydro-Québec as a biller, with your account number, and you’ll be able to make payments without a stub.

I’m already signed up for Online Billing. Can I sign up for the Equalized Payments Plan (EPP)?

Yes. You can sign up for EPP from your Customer Space or by calling the toll-free customer services number, 1 888 385-7252.

I’ve opted for the Equalized Payments Plan (EPP). Can I keep using it if I sign up for Online Billing?

Yes. Signing up for Online Billing will not affect the services you already have, like the EPP or Pre-authorized Debit.

How much does it cost to use Online Billing?

Nothing. Hydro-Québec provides this service free of charge.

Can I keep my online bills?

Yes. Your bills are automatically archived for two years and you can view them from your Customer Space. You can also save them on your computer or print them out and file them, just like any other PDF document.

How long will my online bills be available in my Customer Space?

Your bills will be available in your Customer Space for two years. If you wish to keep them longer, you can save them on your computer or print them out and file them, just like any other PDF document.

What happens if I move?

Just notify us of your change of address, and your Customer Space will automatically be updated. You’ll receive, as usual, an e-mail message informing you that your bill is ready and waiting. The final invoice for your old address will also be available there.

How long will it take to receive my first online bill after I sign up?

As soon as a bill is issued, Hydro-Québec will send you an e-mail notification, telling you the amount due, the balance and the due date. The e-mail will include a link to your Customer Space, where you can view your bill.

Can I cancel Online Billing from my Customer Space?

Yes. If you do, you’ll receive your future bills by regular mail.

If I am responsible for several accounts, can I have only some of them displayed in my Customer Space?

Yes, if you are a business customer. Simply ask us to make the change in one of the following ways:

  • Send us an e-mail
  • Contact your representative
  • Call customer services
    • Small Power (Rate G and billing under $100,000 a year)—1 877 956-5696
    • Medium Power (Rate G9, M or DM or Rate G and billing over $100,000 a year)—1 800 463-9900

Note, however, that you cannot change the list of accounts for which you hold a proxy. Only accounts listed on your proxy form can be displayed in your Customer Space.

Once I sign up for Online Payment, how long will it be before I can start submitting payment orders?

You can start submitting payment orders as soon as you sign up. You can even pay your most recent bill this way, if you like.

Can I submit payment orders in advance?

Yes. You can schedule payments up to six months in advance.

Can I submit one or more payment orders and pay an amount of my choosing on each account?

Yes. You can decide how much to pay on each account. But please note that each payment will be applied against the account in this order:

  1. Deposit
  2. Service reconnection charges
  3. Other charges (administration fees, for example) and electricity consumption, in the order in which they were incurred.

This priority applies, no matter what your method of payment.

I receive confirmation when I submit a payment order?

Yes. You will receive a confirmation number for each payment order. You can display a detailed list of your payment orders from your Customer Space, which indicates whether each order is pending, completed or refused. You can also modify a payment order that has not yet been processed.

Can I sign up for Online Payment without Online Billing?

Yes, but there are many advantages to signing up for Online Billing.

How much does it cost to use Online Payment?

Nothing. Hydro-Québec provides this service free of charge. However, some financial institutions charge a service fee for debits.

How can I know if my financial institution has refused a payment that I ordered?

The word “Refused” will appear in red on your list of payments, and your account balance will be adjusted accordingly. Note, however, that it takes a few days for your financial institution to process your payment order and accept or refuse it.

I’m already signed up for the Pre-authorized Debit service. Can I keep using it if I sign up for Online Billing?

Yes. The amount to be paid is still automatically debited from your bank account on the due date.

Can I make changes to my bank account information online?

Yes, you can do it in your secure Customer Space.

Can I choose the debit date?

No. With Pre-authorized Debit, all bill payments are debited from your bank account on the due date.

Can I switch from Pre-authorized Debit to Online Payment?

Yes, but you must call us to cancel your Pre-authorized Debit service before signing up for Online Payment in your Customer Space.

How much does it cost to use Pre-authorized Debit?

Nothing. Hydro-Québec provides this service free of charge. However, some financial institutions charge a service fee for debits.

Where does the information about my electricity use and the outdoor temperature come from?

Electricity use

If you have a next-generation meter, it automatically records and sends us your electricity use every day. To determine your daily use, we take the last number received each day and subtract the last number from the day before. The result of this calculation is obtained overnight and each morning you can check how much electricity you used the previous day.

If you have a non-communicating meter, your meter is read every 60 days or so. To establish your electricity use during this period, we take the latest reading and subtract the previous reading. We then calculate your average daily consumption to determine your monthly electricity use.

Outdoor temperature

The mean outdoor temperature charts are based on data supplied daily by the weather station nearest you. These charts can help you understand how temperature affects your electricity use. If your home is far from the station, the outside temperature in your area may differ from the one shown in the chart.

Dual-energy customers (Rate DT)

Please note that the mean outdoor temperature is not the temperature measured by the sensor for Rate DT billing. The outdoor temperature may have dropped below your rate’s threshold (-12°C or -15°C, depending on where you live) throughout the day, even if the mean temperature shown is 10°C. To learn more, see our detailed information on Rate DT.

I just moved. Why don’t I have access to this service?

You have to wait 10 days from the start of your service contract to view your consumption profile. We need those 10 days to verify the information related to your change of address. The 10 days start on the day you inform us of your move if your do so after you move.

What happens if my meter cannot be read for one or several days?

As soon as we are able to read your meter again, we will subtract the result of the previous reading to calculate your electricity use and determine an average for your consumption.

Example:
Meter reading on November 6: 48,800
Meter reading on November 7: not available
Meter reading on November 8: 48,900

Calculating average consumption
November 8 reading: 48,900
Minus November 6 reading: 48,800
Consumption over two days: 100 kWh

Your consumption profile will show 50 kWh for November 7, and 50 kWh for November 8 (100 kWh divided by 2). The 100 kWh total is the actual consumption of November 7 and 8, which will be shown as an average consumption (distributed evenly over the two days).

What are the conditions of use for the My Consumption Profile tool?

This tool is designed to help you better understand your electricity use. Daily electricity use data may not be available.

The information presented in the tool is intended for general information purposes and does not constitute your bill. If there is a difference between the number of kilowatthours or the dollar amounts presented in the tool and the information on your bill, the amounts and the electricity use indicated on your bill shall prevail.

General questions

What is the Dare to Compare service?

Dare to Compare is a free service to allow you to see at a glance if your household uses more or less electricity than the average household like yours.

How does it work?

First you answer 11 questions (online questionnaire). Your answers allow us to match you with a comparison group formed of similar households.

Then you get your result, which includes the following:

  • A dial showing your electricity use as compared to that of the comparison group average (note that your result is based on your actual electricity use, not on an estimate)
  • The difference between your consumption and the average in both kilowatthours and dollars
  • The percentage of households that use less electricity than yours
  • Tips on conserving electricity

What’s it for?

The Dare to Compare service is meant to help you understand your electricity consumption and compare it with that of similar households. It is part of Hydro-Québec’s energy efficiency strategy, which aims to support customers’ efforts to save electricity.

Does the service compare the consumption of fuel?

Dare to Compare only looks at electricity data. Consumption of any other type of energy (such as gas or wood) is not compared. Other energy sources used are taken into consideration in determining the comparison group, however.

For example, if you don’t have electric heating, your household is compared with other households with fuel-fired heating systems.

What’s the difference between Dare to Compare and the Home Diagnostic?

Dare to Compare

  • This service compares household electricity use with that of a similar group (type of dwelling, number of occupants, etc.) that uses electricity for similar purposes (heating, hot water, etc.)
  • Tips on saving energy are provided along with comparison result
  • Only 11 questions (to determine comparison group).

Home Diagnostic

  • This service provides a personalized analysis of energy consumption by use and source
  • Very detailed report, including personalized recommendations, potential savings, estimated costs of improvements and payback period
  • Much more detailed questionnaire (43 to 127 questions, depending on dwelling type and energy uses).

Who’s it for?

If you’re a residential customer* who pays Rate D or DT,** you can use Dare to Compare, no matter whether you’re a homeowner or a tenant. You can compare your principal residence, secondary residence or cottage. The rate you pay is indicated on your bill.

You can use Dare to Compare even if you’ve already done the Home Diagnostic.

To make the comparison valid and useful, you must meet the following conditions:

  • The electricity bill must be in your name, your contract must be current and you must live at the service address.
  • You must pay Rate D or DT.
  • You must have a consumption profile dating back at least 280 days in a row (just over nine months), in order for the analysis period to be valid.
  • The consumption on your last bill in the analysis period must not have been estimated (E).
  • The consumption in the billing period before the analysis period must not have been estimated (E).
  • Your building must be exclusively residential.
  • If the rate applied to your service contract has changed, you must have a consumption history of at least 420 days at your present rate.

* A lack of comparable data makes it impossible to produce Dare to Compare results for residents of Schefferville and Nunavik or for municipal grid customers. Hydro-Québec does offer other energy efficiency programs for those customers, however. Please ask your municipal utility about programs in your community.

** Does not apply to contracts at Rate DM.

Questionnaire

Will my answers be shared with anyone outside Hydro-Québec?

No. The information you provide will be kept entirely confidential, as required by the Act Respecting Access to Documents Held by Public Bodies and the Protection of Personal Information (R.S.Q., c. A-2.1). Only authorized Hydro-Québec employees will have access to it.

I live in a one-storey single-family dwelling between a duplex and a triplex. Is it considered a detached house or a row house attached on both sides?

If there is no space between your house and your next-door neighbors, you live in a row house attached on both sides. In the questionnaire, a detached house is one with land between it and the next house on either side. The same applies to duplexes and triplexes.

We live in a bungalow, but we converted the basement to an apartment that we rent out to students. Is that considered a duplex?

Yes. If the basement has been converted into an apartment with its own address and electricity meter, your house consists of two units and is therefore a duplex.

I live on the third floor of a triplex, which has been subdivided into two flats. The building contains four units. Is it still a triplex or is it a building with 4–8 units?

The building has had four addresses since it was subdivided, and it is very likely that each unit has its own electricity meter. You should answer that it is a building with 4–8 units. A triplex always has three units (three addresses), whether they are on two or three floors. For example, a two-storey building with one downstairs flat and two upstairs is considered a triplex.

At the beginning of the year, there were four of us (my husband, our two children and me) living in our house. Then our third child was born in February and my mother came to stay for six months to help out. It’s the end of July and I’m answering the Dare to Compare questionnaire. How many occupants should I put down?

To determine the number of occupants, first look at the analysis period. If the past 12 months go from last August 1 to this July 31, there are four occupants for the first 6 months and six for the last 6 months (February to July, inclusive). The two extra occupants only occupied the house for just under half the year, so that is the equivalent to one occupant for the whole year. You should answer five.

Occupants Time Occupants for year
(occupants x time)
4 1 year 4
2 ½ year 1
Response 5

My two children live with me every second week. My new partner has sole custody of her daughter. Does that make three or five occupants?

Actually, that makes four. If your partner and her daughter have lived with you for the past 12 months (analysis period), you should answer four occupants. You + your partner + her daughter make three. Your two children together count as just one occupant because they only live with you half the time.

Occupants Time Occupants for year
(occupants x time)
3 1 year 3
2 Half time = ½ year 1
Response 4

I live in an 800–sq. ft. loft. Is it considered a single room?

In open-plan homes like lofts, there are usually different areas for different purposes, such as a kitchen, dining room, living room and bedroom. In such a case, you can count four heated rooms.

There is no average or maximum size that defines a room. A home may have one 80–sq. ft. room adjoining another measuring 350 sq. ft. They are considered to be two separate rooms.

I have a condo. Should I count common spaces or areas as heated rooms?

No. If you don’t pay directly for heating them, don’t count them. The cost of heating common areas is usually built into condo fees.

I’m answering the questions about our country house, which we only occupy on weekends and a few weeks a year. In winter, the heating is turned down during the week. Should I reduce the number of occupants to reflect the fact that we’re not there a lot?

No. The number of occupants should be the number of people who are there when the house is occupied. But remember to take this into account when reading your result. Your consumption will probably be lower than the comparison group average, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the house is energy-efficient. You should still follow the recommendations on improving its energy efficiency.

How can I tell whether my electricity bill covers the cost of hot water?

If you’re a tenant, check your lease to see whether hot water is included in your rent. If so, your landlord pays for it and your electricity bill doesn’t cover it.

Also, if you have a gas water heater, then your electricity bill doesn’t cover hot water.

I live in an apartment building with a pool. Should I count that?

No. As a rule, either the building owner pays pool operating costs, or else they are included in condo fees or rent. Your electricity bill does not cover them.

Questions about Dare to Compare results

How is the comparison done?

  • Your profile is determined on the basis of your answers to the Dare to Compare questionnaire concerning specific characteristics.
  • Then you’re matched with a comparison group formed of similar households.
  • Your consumption is calculated for a given analysis period.
  • The average electricity consumption is calculated for the comparison group and the same period, then adjusted according to the temperatures in your region.
  • Your consumption and costs are compared with the average.

Characteristics used to determine your profile:

  • Dwelling type: detached house, semidetached house, row house, duplex, triplex, etc.
  • Number of heated rooms
  • Energy used for heating and hot water
  • Number of occupants
  • Energy used to heat pool, if applicable

Combinations of these characteristics are used to form over 1,000 comparison groups. This makes the comparison average more accurate and appropriate than the average of all Residential Customers would be. In other words, we compare apples with apples.

Your total electricity consumption comes from your billing data, which you can see by looking at your consumption profile in your Customer Space.

Is the geographic region also taken into account?

Yes. The electricity use of your comparison group is adjusted according to the temperatures recorded in your region during the analysis period. A customer who lives in Abitibi doesn’t have the same heating needs as one living in downtown Montréal, and that’s why we take it into account. To make this adjustment, we use a mathematical formula based on degree-days in your region during the analysis period. It’s as if all the households in your comparison group had lived in your region during the analysis period!

Do you take air-conditioning into account?

There is no question on air-conditioning because it is not a statistically significant characteristic. If you have an air conditioner, the amount of electricity it uses is included in your total electricity consumption. The amount of electricity used for air-conditioning is included in the comparison group’s total electricity consumption, as well. To get an idea of how much electricity you use for air-conditioning, you can use our online calculation tool. Even better, fill in the Home Diagnostic to get a precise assessment of how much electricity you consume for air-conditioning. Heavy use could explain higher-than-average electricity consumption.

My result indicates that I use less electricity than the comparison group. Does that mean I don’t need to do anything?

No, but it does mean you’re on the right track! The tips you get with your report will help you improve your energy efficiency if you haven’t already followed them.

Don’t forget that your comparison group’s average consumption may change. Your position with respect to the group may also change. You can track your result using the Dare to Compare link in your Customer Space every time you receive an electricity bill based on a meter reading. We always show the most up-to-date result.

My result shows that my electricity use is higher than average. I don’t understand why.

If the characteristics of your household are similar to those of the comparison group, the difference is probably due to your energy use habits and your home’s energy efficiency.

To get a clearer idea of suitable energy efficiency measures to take and how they could affect your electricity use (in costs and kilowatthours), you should use the free Home Diagnostic.

On the other hand, your home may have some special feature that sets it apart from the comparison group. For example, a house with 12 heated rooms is compared with houses that have 7 or more rooms. Five rooms can make a huge difference to energy consumption.

I’ve applied the energy efficiency measures recommended by the Home Diagnostic, but my Dare to Compare result indicates that my household is energy-hungry. How can that be?

Here are a few possible reasons:

  • Maybe your improvements are too recent to be reflected in the electricity consumption analyzed by Dare to Compare. For example, if you changed heating features or habits, you won’t see any difference until the analysis period includes a heating season. To track your changes and those in the comparison group, use the Dare to Compare link in your Customer Space regularly.
  • If your Dare to Compare answers truly reflect your household, you should look at how you’re different from the comparison group and how that could have a negative impact on your result. For example, a house with 12 heated rooms is compared with houses that have 7 or more rooms. Five rooms can make a huge difference to energy consumption.
  • If you have a heated pool, there’s a good chance that your electricity use is higher than the comparison group average, because the group includes households with unheated pools (or pools heated without electricity). To get a clearer idea of suitable energy efficiency measures to take and how they could affect your electricity use (in costs and kilowatthours), you should reread your personalized Home Diagnostic report. It gives a breakdown by type of use and tells you how much energy you use to heat your pool.

If my result is higher than average, will my bill go up?

No. The Dare to Compare report has no effect on rates or billing. It’s a free service that helps you become more aware of how you use electricity by comparing your consumption with that of similar households and offers guidance on saving electricity.

What else can I do?

If I move, can I answer the Dare to Compare questionnaire again?

Yes, but you’ll have to wait a while to accumulate the consumption data needed for the comparison (at least 280 days in a row).

My situation has changed. Can I change the answers I submitted?

Yes, you can change your answers. Just go to your Customer Space and click on the Dare to Compare link. But remember, your answers should still reflect your situation during most of the analysis period. If your situation has just changed recently, don’t change your answers yet. Wait a while, so the new situation is reflected in your result.

I’ve followed some of the Dare to Compare energy efficiency tips. When will I see a difference on my electricity bill?

You may start to see a difference within a few months, or it may take longer, depending on what measures you’ve taken and what season they apply to. For example, if the changes involve heating, you won’t see any difference until the analysis period includes a heating season.

How can I track my Dare to Compare results?

Just go to your Customer Space and click on the Dare to Compare link. Your result and that of your comparison group are updated every billing period (every two months, if your meter is read) or whenever you change your answers.

How can I get advice on improving my result?

Your Dare to Compare result comes with tips. Plus, if you haven’t done so yet, it would be a good idea to fill in the Home Diagnostic which generates an even more personalized report, including recommendations, potential savings, estimated costs of improvements and payback period.

You should also regularly check out the Energy Efficiency section of our Web site. You’ll find tips and advice on being energy wise.

I’ve done the Home Diagnostic and received my report. Do I have to answer the Dare to Compare questionnaire, as well, if I want to compare my electricity use to that of similar households?

No. The online version of the Home Diagnostic automatically transfers your answers to the Dare to Compare questionnaire. If you go to the Dare to Compare result from your Customer Space, you’ll see that the questionnaire has already been filled in and that the results are displayed. Take the time to review the answers, though, just in case your situation has changed since you filled in the Home Diagnostic questionnaire.

You can also access your personalized Home Diagnostic recommendations report online. You’ll find the same information as before, but enhanced by the result of the comparison with similar households. If your situation has changed since the last time you filled in the questionnaire, update your answers.

Miniglossary of energy terms

Energy and power

In the context of electricity consumption, energy is the power consumed within a given period.

Power is expressed in watts (W), and energy is expressed in watthours (Wh). One kilowatt equals a thousand watts, and one kilowatthour equals a thousand kilowatthours.

Watt and watthour

The watt (W) is a unit of measure of power, and the watthour (Wh) is a unit of measure of energy. One kilowatt equals a thousand watts, and one kilowatthour equals a thousand kilowatthours.

For example, the power of a lightbulb is measured in watts (40 W, 60 W, etc.), but the energy it uses is measured in watthours or, more often, kilowatthours (kWh).

So a 60-W bulb that is on for an hour uses 60 Wh. If it is on for 1,000 hours, it uses 1,000 times more: 60,000 Wh, or 60 kWh, of electricity.

Your electricity bill always shows your consumption in kilowatthours (kWh).

Degree-day

A degree-day represents a mean daily temperature one degree Celsius below a given baseline outdoor temperature. After analyzing load and temperature data, Hydro-Québec set the baseline temperature at 15°C. Degree-days are an indicator of heat requirements.

For example, a mean temperature of 12°C amounts to 3 degree-days. A mean overnight temperature of 18°C amounts to 0 degree-days.

NB: If you have a next-generation meter, you don’t need to read it, because the electricity-use data is automatically transmitted every day.

Why did I receive a meter-reading card?

Because the meter reader was unable to access your meter. With this card, you can take the reading yourself and submit it to us either online or by phone (call 514 385-8464 in the Montréal area or 1 877-385-8464 elsewhere in Québec). Then we can prepare your next bill based on your actual consumption.

How soon do I have to submit my meter reading?

You can submit your reading as soon as you receive the card. It’s important to do so promptly, to make sure your next bill reflects your actual consumption.

What happens if I receive a meter-reading card, but I forget to submit my meter reading?

If we don’t receive your meter reading, your next bill will be based on your estimated consumption. Your bill won’t be adjusted until the meter reader is able to access your meter, so that will be at least two months.

What’s the advantage of submitting my meter reading online?

By submitting your meter reading online at hydroquebec.com/autoreleve, you’ll prevent any delays in processing. Then your next bill will reflect the amount of electricity you’ve actually used.

Do I have to submit my meter reading online?

No. You can give us your meter reading by calling 514 385-8464 in the Montréal area or 1 877-385-8464 elsewhere in Québec.

Electricity terms and their definitions.

Energy

Energy, expressed in kilowatthours (kWh), is the power used by electrical equipment over a given period of time. It is calculated as power (wattage), expressed in watts (W), multiplied by the time during which it is used, expressed in hours (h).

Energy in kilowatt-hours equals to power in watts multiplied by time used in hours divided by one thousand.

Load factor

The load factor (LF) is the relationship between the real power consumed (kWh) and the maximum power that can be used in a given period, as a function of the use of the maximum power demand. It is used to evaluate the use of maximum power demand for a given billing period

Load factor equals to consumption during period (kilowatt-hour) divided by maximum power demand times number of hours in period, then multiplied by 100.

Power factor

The power factor (PF) is the ratio between real power and apparent power.

Power factor equals to real power divided by apparent power, then multiplied by 100.

Current

Current, expressed in amperes (A), is the number of electrons carried by a conductor in one second. It is a function of voltage, expressed in volts (V), and resistance, expressed in ohms (Ω).

Current in ampere equals to voltage divided by resistance in ohms.

Separate metering

Method of measuring energy consumed with a separate meter for each residential or commercial unit in a building.

Bulk metering

Method of measuring energy consumed with a single meter instead of separate meters for an entire multiunit commercial or residential building. The building owner is responsible for dividing the costs between the occupants.

Multiplier

A factor used to multiply the number of kilowatts used and, in some cases, the fixed charge, so that the bill reflects actual consumption.

Winter period

The winter period runs from December 1 through March 31 of the next year, inclusive.

Summer period

The summer period runs from April 1 through November 30, inclusive.

Power demand

Power demand, expressed in kilowatts (kW), is the total amount of electricity required by equipment at a given time. In more technical terms, it is the combined effect of voltage, expressed in volts (V), and current, expressed in amperes (A).

Power in kilowatt equals to voltage times current in amperes divided by 1,000.

Apparent power

Apparent power is the power supplied by Hydro-Québec. When it is used, it is broken down into real power (kW), which runs devices, and reactive power (kVAR), which results in the creation of magnetic fields.

Minimum demand

Minimum demand is the minimum amount of power billed, and is automatically based on your previous winter consumption.

Since April 1, 2011, minimum demand has replaced contract power for all Rate M customers.

Minimum billing demand

This is the minimum amount of power you pay for. The threshold is set so that you pay your share of the costs Hydro-Québec incurs to meet your power needs during peak periods. The minimum billing demand is determined by the conditions of each rate, as indicated in the Electricity Rates.

Minimum demand is the minimum amount of power billed, and is automatically based on either your previous winter consumption or your contract power at the applicable rate.

Available power

The maximum power for a given contract that you may not exceed without Hydro-Québec's approval.

Real power

Real power, expressed in kilowatts (kW), is the component of apparent power that operates devices that produce heat (lighting, radiators, etc.).

Contract power

For Hydro-Québec, contract power is the amount of power it must be ready to supply at any time in response to your demand. For you, it is the minimum power you have to pay for.

Rate M customers

Since April 1, 2011, the automatically calculated minimum demand has replaced contract power for all Rate M customers.

Voltage

Difference in electrical level (or potential) between two points, e.g., a conductor and mass. The greater the difference, the higher the voltage. The Distributor supplies its customers' electrical installations at low, medium and high voltage levels. These voltages are standardized.

Voltage (V) multiplied by current (A) equals power (W).